Cyanobacteria and BMAA exposure from desert dust: A possible link to sporadic ALS among Gulf War veterans

@article{Cox2009CyanobacteriaAB,
  title={Cyanobacteria and BMAA exposure from desert dust: A possible link to sporadic ALS among Gulf War veterans},
  author={Paul Alan Cox and Renee Richer and James S Metcalf and Sandra Anne Banack and Geoffrey A. Codd and Walter G Bradley},
  journal={Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis},
  year={2009},
  volume={10},
  pages={109 - 117}
}
Abstract Veterans of the 1990–1991 Gulf War have been reported to have an increased incidence of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) compared to personnel who were not deployed. An excess of ALS cases was diagnosed in Gulf War veterans younger than 45 years of age. Increased ALS among Gulf War veterans appears to be an outbreak time-limited to the decade following the Gulf War. Seeking to identify biologically plausible environmental exposures, we have focused on inhalation of cyanobacteria and… 
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