Cyanide in the Chemical Arsenal of Garlic Mustard, Alliaria petiolata

@article{Cipollini2006CyanideIT,
  title={Cyanide in the Chemical Arsenal of Garlic Mustard, Alliaria petiolata},
  author={Donald F. Cipollini and B. Gruner},
  journal={Journal of Chemical Ecology},
  year={2006},
  volume={33},
  pages={85-94}
}
Cyanide production has been reported from over 2500 plant species, including some members of the Brassicaceae. We report that the important invasive plant, Alliaria petiolata, produces levels of cyanide in its tissues that can reach 100 ppm fresh weight (FW), a level considered toxic to many vertebrates. In a comparative study, levels of cyanide in leaves of young first-year plants were 25 times higher than in leaves of young Arabidopsis thaliana plants and over 150 times higher than in leaves… Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
This study is the first to directly compare the effects of these invasive species on a suite of native, ecologically-relevant target species and confirms the strong direct allelopathic effects of A. petiolata, though the strength of the effect varies withtarget species and with type of tissue used to make extracts. Expand
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