Cuttlefish use startle displays, but not against large predators

@article{Langridge2009CuttlefishUS,
  title={Cuttlefish use startle displays, but not against large predators},
  author={Keri V. Langridge},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2009},
  volume={77},
  pages={847-856}
}
Prey animals can survive a predatory encounter if they communicate unprofitability to an approaching predator. Otherwise undefended prey often use conspicuous deimatic (frightening) displays to intimidate closely approaching predators into delaying or aborting an attack. The ‘startle’ displays of several insect groups are the best-known example: comprising a sudden size increase coupled with a conspicuous ‘eyespot’ pattern, these displays can effectively deter highly dangerous avian predators… Expand
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