Cuttlefish camouflage: The effects of substrate contrast and size in evoking uniform, mottle or disruptive body patterns

@article{Barbosa2008CuttlefishCT,
  title={Cuttlefish camouflage: The effects of substrate contrast and size in evoking uniform, mottle or disruptive body patterns},
  author={Alexandra Barbosa and Lydia M. M{\"a}thger and K C Buresch and Jennifer Kelly and Charles Chubb and Chuan-Chin Chiao and Roger T. Hanlon},
  journal={Vision Research},
  year={2008},
  volume={48},
  pages={1242-1253}
}

Figures from this paper

Mottle camouflage patterns in cuttlefish: quantitative characterization and visual background stimuli that evoke them
TLDR
Cuttlefish were tested on artificial and natural substrates to experimentally determine some primary visual background cues that evoke mottle patterns, and quantitatively measuring the scale and contrast of mottled skin components and relating these statistics to specific visual background stimuli that evoke this type of background-matching pattern.
Visual contrast modulates maturation of camouflage body patterning in cuttlefish (Sepia pharaonis).
TLDR
Results suggest that the maturation of camouflage body patterns in S. pharaonis is at least in part affected by visual contrast of their rearing backgrounds, although environmental complexity or social interaction is also likely to be involved in this process.
How visual edge features influence cuttlefish camouflage patterning
Vertical Visual Features Have a Strong Influence on Cuttlefish Camouflage
TLDR
These experiments support field observations that, in some marine habitats, cuttlefish will respond to vertically oriented background features even when the preponderance of visual information in their field of view seems to be from the 2D surrounding substrate.
Cephalopod dynamic camouflage: bridging the continuum between background matching and disruptive coloration
TLDR
The chief characteristics of the three major body pattern types used for camouflage by cephalopods are defined: uniform and mottle patterns for background matching, and disruptive patterns that primarily enhance disruptiveness but aid background matching as well.
Cuttlefish camouflage: context-dependent body pattern use during motion
TLDR
It is found that the body pattern used during motion is context-specific and that high-contrast body pattern components are significantly reduced during movement, and cuttlefish do not use high contrast motion dazzle.
Edge detection and texture classification by cuttlefish.
TLDR
The results suggest that the choice of camouflage pattern is consistent with a simple model of how cuttlefish classify visual textures, according to whether they are Uniform or patterned, and whether the pattern includes visual edges.
Size Matters: Observed and Modeled Camouflage Response of European Cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) to Different Substrate Patch Sizes during Movement
TLDR
A computational model is constructed capturing the main features of the observed camouflaging behavior of Sepia officinalis cuttlefish, and suggests that the animal's length serves as a possible threshold filter below which objects are considered irrelevant for camouflage, reducing the frequency of reflectance changes—which may lead to detection.
A review of visual perception mechanisms that regulate rapid adaptive camouflage in cuttlefish
TLDR
This sensorimotor approach of studying cuttlefish camouflage provides unique insights into the mechanisms of visual perception in an invertebrate image-forming eye.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 54 REFERENCES
Disruptive coloration in cuttlefish: a visual perception mechanism that regulates ontogenetic adjustment of skin patterning
TLDR
The results indicate that cuttlefish are solving a visual scaling problem of camouflage presumably without visual confirmation of the size of their own skin component.
Perception of visual texture and the expression of disruptive camouflage by the cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis
TLDR
Cuttlefish probably have edge detectors that control the expression of disruptive pattern, and it seems probable that cuttlefish display disruptive camouflage when there are edges in the visual background caused by discrete objects such as pebbles.
Cuttlefish camouflage: visual perception of size, contrast and number of white squares on artificial checkerboard substrata initiates disruptive coloration.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that the size, contrast and number of white objects in the surrounding substratum influence the production and expression of disruptive skin patterns in young cuttlefish.
Disruptive Body Patterning of Cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) Requires Visual Information Regarding Edges and Contrast of Objects in Natural Substrate Backgrounds
TLDR
The results show that, to evoke disruptive coloration in cuttlefish, visual information about the edges and contrast of objects within natural substrate backgrounds is required.
Cuttlefish cue visually on area--not shape or aspect ratio--of light objects in the substrate to produce disruptive body patterns for camouflage.
TLDR
This study examines the shapes and aspect ratios of white objects on black backgrounds that lead cuttlefish to show disruptive coloration and develops a non-invasive assay that monitors motor output resulting from different visual inputs (computer-generated artificial substrates).
Disruptive coloration elicited on controlled natural substrates in cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis
TLDR
This study assembled a natural rock substrate with those features that are thought to elicit disruptive coloration in cuttlefish and found that the results support this prediction, and that there is a strong correlation between fine details of the visual background properties and the resultant body pattern shown by the Cuttlefish.
Visual Background Features That Elicit Mottled Body Patterns in Cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis
TLDR
It is concluded that a high frequency of light and dark small objects of similar proportions in the visual background tends to elicit mottled body patterns.
Cuttlefish responses to visual orientation of substrates, water flow and a model of motion camouflage
TLDR
Investigation of orientation sensitivity in the cuttlefish Sepia pharaonis, by allowing animals to settle on stripe patterns shows that the animals see orientation, because they prefer to rest with the body-axis perpendicular to the stripes.
Cuttlefish camouflage: a quantitative study of patterning
TLDR
It is suggested that the differences may arise because S. pharaonis needs to produce camouflage that is effective when viewed over a relatively wide range of distances.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...