Current hypotheses for the evolution of sex and recombination.

@article{Hartfield2012CurrentHF,
  title={Current hypotheses for the evolution of sex and recombination.},
  author={Matthew Hartfield and Peter D. Keightley},
  journal={Integrative zoology},
  year={2012},
  volume={7 2},
  pages={
          192-209
        }
}
The evolution of sex is one of the most important and controversial problems in evolutionary biology. Although sex is almost universal in higher animals and plants, its inherent costs have made its maintenance difficult to explain. The most famous of these is the twofold cost of males, which can greatly reduce the fecundity of a sexual population, compared to a population of asexual females. Over the past century, multiple hypotheses, along with experimental evidence to support these, have been… Expand
The ecology of sexual reproduction
TLDR
The evidence from natural populations and from laboratory experiments point to antagonistic coevolution as a potent and possibly ubiquitous force of selection favouring cross‐fertilization and recombination. Expand
The Queen of Problems in Evolutionary Biology
TLDR
Experimental evolution studies show that outcrossing can speed up the response to selection, while studies on natural populations emphasise the importance of niche differentiation and parasites. Expand
Sex increases the probability of evolutionary rescue in the presence of a competitor
TLDR
The results indicate that sex may be the beneficial strategy in the presence of the competitor, and the overall advantage of sex was also manifested through higher level of adaptedness of survived sexual populations relative to asexual populations. Expand
Transmissible cancers and the evolution of sex under the Red Queen hypothesis
TLDR
It is confirmed that vertical transmission of cancerous cells can promote the evolution of sex through a separate mechanism, known as similarity selection, that does not depend on coevolutionary fluctuations. Expand
Transmissible cancers and the evolution of sex under the Red Queen hypothesis
TLDR
It is confirmed that vertical transmission of cancerous cells can promote the evolution of sex through a separate mechanism, known as similarity selection, that does not depend on coevolutionary fluctuations. Expand
Transmissible cancers do not easily select for sexual reproduction
TLDR
The results suggest that antagonistic interactions between early multicellular organisms and transmissible cancers are unlikely to be responsible for the evolution and maintenance of sexual reproduction. Expand
Evolutionary genetic consequences of facultative sex and outcrossing
  • M. Hartfield
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of evolutionary biology
  • 2016
TLDR
An overview of existing research on the evolutionary basis behind different reproductive modes is provided, with a focus on explaining the population genetic effects favouring low outcrossing rates in either partially selfing or asexual species. Expand
Genetic diversity in facultatively sexual populations and its implications for the origins of self-incompatibility in algae and fungi
TLDR
Although populations with mating types successfully engage in sexual reproduction less frequently than their self-compatible competitors, they can nevertheless engage in useful sex with genetically distinct partners more frequently, and the potential for frequency-dependent selection in competitive dynamics between self- compatible and self-incompatible types is demonstrated. Expand
Investigating Trade-offs in Sexual Populations with Gene Flow
TLDR
It is argued that microbial experimental evolution is an important way in which claims about trade-offs and sex can be tested and that these experiments need to be developed to better represent real world ecological and evolutionary problems. Expand
Sex and recombination purge the genome of deleterious alleles: An Individual Based Modeling Approach
TLDR
The purifying selection hypothesis, the hypothesis that recombination due to sexual reproduction helps to eliminate deleterious alleles from the genome through the selection of reduced function mutations, is corroborated. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 180 REFERENCES
The advantage of sex in evolving yeast populations
TLDR
The results show that sex increases mean fitness in an environment to which the populations were well adapted, but not in an environments to which new adaptation occurred, supporting the hypothesis that the advantage of sexuality lay in the removal of deleterious mutations. Expand
Sex increases the efficacy of natural selection in experimental yeast populations
TLDR
It is shown that, as predicted by the theory, sex increases the rate of adaptation to a new harsh environment but has no measurable effect on fitness in a new benign environment where there is little selection. Expand
The ecological cost of sex
TLDR
Here it is shown the existence of a threshold growth rate for the sexual population, above which the invasion is halted by intraspecific competition, and the asexual population then exerts a weaker inhibitory effect on the carrying capacity of theSexual population than on its own carrying capacity. Expand
Sexual reproduction as an adaptation to resist parasites (a review).
TLDR
P parasite coevolution is superior to previous models of the evolution of sex by supporting the stability of sex under the following challenging conditions: very low fecundity, realistic patterns of genotype fitness and changing environment, and frequent mutation to parthenogenesis, even while sex pays the full 2-fold cost. Expand
Mutation accumulation in space and the maintenance of sexual reproduction.
TLDR
It is shown that local dispersal and local competition can explain the maintenance of sexual reproduction as a means of purging deleterious mutations, and how spatial processes affect mutation accumulation can fully erode the twofold benefit of asexuality faster than an asexual clone can take over a sexual population. Expand
Selection against deleterious mutations and the maintenance of biparental sex.
  • R. S. Howard
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Theoretical population biology
  • 1994
TLDR
It is shown using computer simulation that sexual populations of as many as 10,000 individuals are susceptible to invasion by asexual lineages for mutation rates higher than predicted under the mutational deterministic hypothesis. Expand
Evolutionary traction: the cost of adaptation and the evolution of sex
TLDR
It is shown that without recombination, rare advantageous mutations can result in increased accumulation of deleterious mutations (‘evolutionary traction’), which explains the long‐term advantage of sex under a wide parameter range. Expand
The Evolution of Sex and Recombination in Response to Abiotic or Coevolutionary Fluctuations in Epistasis
TLDR
This work analyzes the evolution of sex and recombination in a two-species coevolutionary model and finds that intermediate parasite migration rates maximize the degree of local adaptation of the parasite and lead to a higher ES recombination rate in the host. Expand
Imperfect genes, Fisherian mutation and the evolution of sex.
TLDR
A mathematical model of mutation and selection that allows for the coexistence of multiple alleles at a locus with very small selective differences between alleles is presented, focusing on fertility selection in an hermaphroditic plant. Expand
The advantages of segregation and the evolution of sex.
  • S. Otto
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Genetics
  • 2003
TLDR
This article is the first to investigate the possibility that sex might have evolved and been maintained to promote segregation, using a model that incorporates both a general selection regime and modifier alleles that alter an individual's allocation to sexual vs. asexual reproduction. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...