Current evidence for self-medication in primates: A multidisciplinary perspective

@article{Huffman1997CurrentEF,
  title={Current evidence for self-medication in primates: A multidisciplinary perspective},
  author={Michael Alan Huffman},
  journal={American Journal of Physical Anthropology},
  year={1997},
  volume={104},
  pages={171-200}
}
  • M. Huffman
  • Published 1997
  • Biology
  • American Journal of Physical Anthropology
The study of self-medication in non-human primates sheds new light on the complex interactions of animal, plant and parasite. A variety of non-nutritional plant secondary compounds and nutrient-poor bark is found in the primate diet, but little is yet known about the possible medicinal consequences of their ingestion. Recent studies of the African great apes support a hypothesis in progress that the non-nutritional ingestion of certain plant species aid in the control of parasite infection and… Expand

Figures and Tables from this paper

Animal self-medication and ethno-medicine: exploration and exploitation of the medicinal properties of plants
  • M. Huffman
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
  • 2003
TLDR
In light of the growing resistance of parasites and pathogens to synthetic drugs, the study of animal self-medication and ethno-medicine offers a novel line of investigation to provide ecologically-sound methods for the treatment of parasites using plant-based medicines in populations and their livestock living in the tropics. Expand
MEDICINAL PROPERTIES IN THE DIET OF GORILLAS: AN ETHNO-PHARMACOLOGICAL EVALUATION
A growing body of literature in the behavioral, ecological and pharmacological sciences suggests that animals use certain plants for the control of parasite infection and related illnesses. It hasExpand
Neanderthal self-medication in context
In a recent study, Hardy et al. (2012) identified compounds from two non-nutritional plants, yarrow and camomile, in a sample of Neanderthal dental calculus from the northern Spanish site of ElExpand
Folklore, Animal Self-Medication, and Phytotherapy-Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, Some Things True.
TLDR
14 case studies of purported animal-inspired plant medicines used by cultures around the world are presented together with ethnomedicinal and pharmacological evidence and a role for animal self-medication research in the rejuvenation of old therapies and possible new discoveries of phytotherapies for human and livestock health is encouraged. Expand
Ethnomedicinal and bioactive properties of plants ingested by wild chimpanzees in Uganda.
TLDR
A greater knowledge of ape's behaviour and health may provide a new complementary method to select plants for biomedical research. Expand
Primate Self-medication and the Treatment of Parasite Infection
TLDR
Of any species studied thus far, chimpanzees have provided the most details for level 2 and 3 behaviors, exemplified by such behaviors as bitter pith chewing and whole leaf swallowing behaviors, used in response to parasite infection. Expand
Primate Self-Medication, Passive Prevention and Active Treatment - A Brief Review
TLDR
Primates have provided the most details for level 3 and 4 behaviors, exemplified by such diverse dietary selection and behaviors as bitter pith chewing and whole leaf swallowing behaviors, used directly in response to increased levels of parasite infection. Expand
The evolution of herbal medicine: behavioural perspectives
TLDR
Examining the predictions and requirements of both the learned and evolutionary explanations points primarily to an evolutionary model for the origin of herbal medicine that was expanded and enhanced by learning and social transmission. Expand
Self-medication by orang-utans (Pongo pygmaeus) using bioactive properties of Dracaena cantleyi
TLDR
This work documents self-medication in the only Asian great ape, orang-utans (Pongo pygmaeus), and for the first time, to the authors' knowledge, the external application of an anti-inflammatory agent in animals. Expand
Unusual feeding behavior in wild great apes, a window to understand origins of self-medication in humans: Role of sociality and physiology on learning process
TLDR
The results show that differences in sociality and physiology between the two species may influence mechanisms that discriminate between plants for nutrition and plants with potential therapeutic dietary components, and conclude that self-medication may have appeared in the authors' ancestors in association with high social tolerance and lack of herbivorous gut specialization. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 146 REFERENCES
An Investigation of the Use of Medicinal Plants by Wild Chimpanzees
It has been proposed that chimpanzees use a number of toxic plant species for their medicinal value. Based on behavior, plant pharmacology, and ethnomedical information, hypotheses concerning theExpand
The adaptive significance of self-medication.
TLDR
The results of several studies attempted to test the adaptive function of particular self-medicating behaviours are discussed in relation to simple hypotheses that can provide a framework for future tests ofSelf-medication. Expand
The impact of plant secondary compounds on primate feeding behavior
TLDR
The observed selectivity and preferences of primates for specific plant or insect species and parts are now viewed as strategies for dealing with the nutrient and secondary compound content variation in these foods. Expand
Grooming with Trattinnickia resin: possible pharmaceutical plant use by coatis in Panama
TLDR
Behavioural, ecological, physiological, phytochemical, and ethnobotanical evidence have been combined to show that the plants are probably used by these animals for medicinal rather than nutritional purposes. Expand
Taste perception and feeding behavior in nonhuman primates and human populations
TLDR
The taste abilities of nonhuman primates in terms of threshold and above‐threshold responses to potential foods must be taken into account, together with psychosensory and sociocultural factors, to understand food choices. Expand
Further Obervations on the Use of the Medicinal Plant, Vernonia amygdalina (Del). By a Wild Chimpanzee, Its Possible Effect on Parasote Load, and Its Phytochemistry
TLDR
New evidence for the effectiveness of medicinal plant use in primates is provided and the current hypothesis regarding the use of V. amygdalina for the control of symptoms from parasitic and gastrointestinal illness by wild chimpanzees is strongly supported. Expand
Strategies in Herbivory by Mammals: The Role of Plant Secondary Compounds
TLDR
Large herbivores must select food from a wide variety of plant parts, species, and strains, and should prefer to feed on foods that contain small amounts of secondary compounds, and their body size and searching strategies should be adapted to optimize the number of types of foods available. Expand
Natural Diet of Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii): Long-Term Record from the Mahale Mountains, Tanzania
All the plant and anin1al foods recorded to be eaten by wild chimpanzees ofKasoje in the Mahale Mountains, Tanzania between 1965 and 1981 are listed up together with some additional miscellaneousExpand
FURTHER MEDICINAL PLANT CONSUMPTION IN WILD CHIMPANZEES
Leaves of Lippia plicata Baker (Verbenaceae) were consumed by an adult female of the M group chimpanzees in thc Mahale Mts. National Park, western Tanzania. The leaves were consumed in a mannerExpand
Possible anti-tumour promoting properties of traditional Thai food items and some of their active constituents.
TLDR
The high potential of the traditional food items of Thailand in the search for potent anti-tumour promoters is described in this article, and curcumin and 1-acetoxychavicol acetate have been idenflfied as the constituents of strongly active plants in the tumour promoter-induced EBV activation test. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...