Current controversies in the USA regarding vaccine safety

@article{Chatterjee2010CurrentCI,
  title={Current controversies in the USA regarding vaccine safety},
  author={Archana Chatterjee and Catherine O’Keefe},
  journal={Expert Review of Vaccines},
  year={2010},
  volume={9},
  pages={497 - 502}
}
As a result of the vaccines discovered in the 20th Century, parents and many healthcare providers of the 21st Century have limited or no experience with the devastating effects of diseases such as polio, smallpox or measles. Fear of disease has shifted to concerns regarding vaccine safety. Scientific evidence has refuted many of the misconceptions regarding vaccine safety; however, parental refusal of vaccines is increasing. Here we review six of the most prevalent controversies surrounding… 
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