Curiously Modern DNA for a ``250 Million-Year-Old'' Bacterium

@article{Nickle2002CuriouslyMD,
  title={Curiously Modern DNA for a ``250 Million-Year-Old'' Bacterium},
  author={David C. Nickle and Gerald H. Learn and Matthew W. Rain and James I. Mullins and John E. Mittler},
  journal={Journal of Molecular Evolution},
  year={2002},
  volume={54},
  pages={134-137}
}
Abstract. Studies of ancient DNA have attracted considerable attention in scientific journals and the popular press. Several of the more extreme claims for ancient DNA have been questioned on biochemical grounds (i.e., DNA surviving longer than expected) and evolutionary grounds (i.e., nucleotide substitution patterns not matching theoretical expectations for ancient DNA). A recent letter to Nature from Vreeland et al. (2000), however, tops all others with respect to age and condition of the… 
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