Curiosity at Gale Crater, Mars: Characterization and Analysis of the Rocknest Sand Shadow

@article{Blake2013CuriosityAG,
  title={Curiosity at Gale Crater, Mars: Characterization and Analysis of the Rocknest Sand Shadow},
  author={David F Blake and Richard V. Morris and Gary A. Kocurek and Shaunna M. Morrison and Robert T. Downs and David L. Bish and Doug W. Ming and Kenneth S. Edgett and David M. Rubin and W. Goetz and Morten Bo Madsen and Robert J. Sullivan and Ralf Gellert and I. C. Campbell and Allan H. Treiman and Scott M. McLennan and Albert S. Yen and John P. Grotzinger and David T. Vaniman and Steve J. Chipera and Cherie N. Achilles and Elizabeth B. Rampe and Dawn Y. Sumner and Pierre‐Yves Meslin and Sylvestre Maurice and Olivier Forni and Olivier Gasnault and Martin Fisk and M. E. Schmidt and Paul R. Mahaffy and Laurie A. Leshin and Daniel P. Glavin and Andrew Steele and Caroline Freissinet and Rafael Navarro‐Gonz{\'a}lez and R. Aileen Yingst and Linda C. Kah and N. Bridges and Kevin W. Lewis and Thomas F. Bristow and Jack D. Farmer and Joy Crisp and Edward M. Stolper and David J Des Marais and Philippe C. Sarrazin},
  journal={Science},
  year={2013},
  volume={341}
}
The Rocknest aeolian deposit is similar to aeolian features analyzed by the Mars Exploration Rovers (MERs) Spirit and Opportunity. The fraction of sand <150 micrometers in size contains ~55% crystalline material consistent with a basaltic heritage and ~45% x-ray amorphous material. The amorphous component of Rocknest is iron-rich and silicon-poor and is the host of the volatiles (water, oxygen, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and chlorine) detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars instrument and… 
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X-ray Diffraction Results from Mars Science Laboratory: Mineralogy of Rocknest at Gale Crater
TLDR
The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity scooped samples of soil from the Rocknest aeolian bedform in Gale crater that revealed plagioclase, forsteritic olivine, augite, and pigeonite, with minor K-feldspar, magnetite, quartz, anhydrite, hematite and ilmenite, which are similar to that found on Earth in places such as soils on the Mauna Kea volcano, Hawaii.
Evidence for a Global Martian Soil Composition Extends to Gale Crater
The eolian bedform within Gale Crater referred to as "Rocknest" was investigated by the science instruments of the Curiosity Mars rover. Physical, chemical and mineralogical results are consistent
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