Curiosity, Wonder, and William Dampier's Painted Prince

@article{Barnes2006CuriosityWA,
  title={Curiosity, Wonder, and William Dampier's Painted Prince},
  author={Geraldine Barnes},
  journal={Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies},
  year={2006},
  volume={6},
  pages={31 - 50}
}
William Dampier, buccaneer turned natural scientist, modelled himself on Sir Francis Drake in his narrative of the twelve-year sequence of voyages (1679-1691) that took him "cleer rownd the globe."1 Drake brought back a fortune in gold and spices, but all that Dampier had to show for his circumnavigation was, as he says in an annotation to the account of those travels in the British Library manuscript Sloane 3236, "this Journal and my painted prince" (fol. 232v). Published by James Knapton as A… Expand
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