Cumulative effects associated with recurrent concussion in collegiate football players: the NCAA Concussion Study.

@article{Guskiewicz2003CumulativeEA,
  title={Cumulative effects associated with recurrent concussion in collegiate football players: the NCAA Concussion Study.},
  author={Kevin M. Guskiewicz and Michael C. McCrea and Stephen W Marshall and Robert C. Cantu and Christopher Randolph and William B. Barr and James A. O{\~n}ate and James P. Kelly},
  journal={JAMA},
  year={2003},
  volume={290 19},
  pages={
          2549-55
        }
}
CONTEXT. [] Key MethodDESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Prospective cohort study of 2905 football players from 25 US colleges were tested at preseason baseline in 1999, 2000, and 2001 on a variety of measures and followed up prospectively to ascertain concussion occurrence.

Figures and Tables from this paper

Acute effects and recovery time following concussion in collegiate football players: the NCAA Concussion Study.
CONTEXT Lack of empirical data on recovery time following sport-related concussion hampers clinical decision making about return to play after injury. OBJECTIVE To prospectively measure immediate
Concussion Incidence and Recurrence in Professional Australian Football Match-Play: A 14-Year Analysis
TLDR
This study provides ecologically valid evidence of the concussion incidence rate in professional Australian football and has implications for the management of athletes sustaining concussion injuries.
Opportunities for Prevention of Concussion and Repetitive Head Impact Exposure in College Football Players: A Concussion Assessment, Research, and Education (CARE) Consortium Study.
TLDR
These data point to a powerful opportunity for policy, education, and other prevention strategies to make the greatest overall reduction in concussion incidence and HIE in college football, particularly during preseason training and football practices throughout the season, without major modification to game play.
Multiple Concussions Increase Odds and Rate of Lower Extremity Injury in National Collegiate Athletic Association Athletes After Return to Play
TLDR
Collegiate athletes with multiple concussions were more likely to sustain a lower extremity injury after RTP in a shorter time frame than were the matched SC and NC athletes.
Return to play and risk of repeat concussion in collegiate football players: comparative analysis from the NCAA Concussion Study (1999–2001) and CARE Consortium (2014–2017)
TLDR
These changes in clinical management appear to have reduced the risk of repetitive concussion during the critical period of cerebral vulnerability after sport-related concussion (SRC), which support international guidelines recommending additional time for brain recovery before athletes RTP after SRC.
The Natural History of Sport-Related Concussion in Collegiate Athletes: Findings from the NCAA-DoD CARE Consortium
TLDR
Although median recovery times are consistent with previous guidelines, it was not until 1 month post-injury that a preponderance of collegiate athletes were cleared to begin the RTP protocol or cleared for unrestricted sport participation, suggesting a largely unified approach to post- injury monitoring and management across all athletes.
Natural History of Concussion in Sport
TLDR
Delayed return to sport was associated with initially greater symptom load, prolonged headache, or subjective concentration deficits, and symptom assessment alone may be predictive of but may underestimate time to complete recovery, which may be better estimated with computerized cognitive testing.
Association Between History of Multiple Concussions and Health Outcomes Among Former College Football Players: 15-Year Follow-up From the NCAA Concussion Study (1999-2001)
TLDR
Associations between a history of multiple concussions and adverse health outcomes were found among former collegiate football players without professional football exposure but were limited to those reporting ≥3 prior concussions.
Concussion in Professional Football: Repeat Injuries—Part 4
TLDR
The most vulnerable players for repeat concussion in professional football are the ball return carrier on special teams and quarterbacks.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 57 REFERENCES
Acute effects and recovery time following concussion in collegiate football players: the NCAA Concussion Study.
CONTEXT Lack of empirical data on recovery time following sport-related concussion hampers clinical decision making about return to play after injury. OBJECTIVE To prospectively measure immediate
Epidemiology of Concussion in Collegiate and High School Football Players
TLDR
Players who sustained one concussion in a season were three times more likely to sustain a second concussion in the same season compared with uninjured players, and contact with artificial turf appears to be associated with a more serious concussion than contact with natural grass.
Unreported Concussion in High School Football Players: Implications for Prevention
TLDR
These findings reflect a higher prevalence of concussion in high school football players than previously reported in the literature and future prevention initiatives should focus on education to improve athlete awareness of the signs of concussion and potential risks of unreported injury.
Relationship between concussion and neuropsychological performance in college football players.
TLDR
It is suggested that neuropsychological assessment is a useful indicator of cognitive functioning in athletes and that both history of multiple concussions and learning disability are associated with reduced cognitive performance.
Concussion incidences and severity in secondary school varsity football players.
TLDR
Contin use of illegal techniques of butt-blocking and face-tackling by as many as 40 per cent of the players was associated with apparent increased risks of concussions and concussion symptoms.
Standardized Assessment of Concussion in football players
TLDR
Investigation of the feasibility and clinical validity of a standardized version of a brief sideline examination complied with guidelines for the management of concussion in sports suggests that a standardized sideline examination of this type can be useful in detecting concussion and determining fitness to return to play.
Concussions in college football
  • W. Buckley
  • Medicine
    The American journal of sports medicine
  • 1988
TLDR
This investigation demonstrated the viability of mul tivariate analysis of sport injury data and confirmed the utility of the log-linear analysis of nominal data.
Guidelines for Return to Contact Sports After a Cerebral Concussion.
  • R. Cantu
  • Medicine
    The Physician and sportsmedicine
  • 1986
TLDR
A practical, on-the-field grading scheme for identifying concussion in contact sports and management of concussion and guidelines for determining when an athlete may safely return to play are discussed.
Postural Stability and Neuropsychological Deficits After Concussion in Collegiate Athletes.
TLDR
Athletes with cerebral concussion demonstrated acute balance deficits, which are likely the result of not using information from the vestibular and visual systems effectively, and more research is necessary to determine the best neuropsychological test battery for assessing sport-related concussion.
Standardized Mental Status Testing on the Sideline After Sport-Related Concussion.
  • M. McCrea
  • Medicine
    Journal of athletic training
  • 2001
TLDR
Standardized mental status testing can be a valuable tool to assist the sports medicine clinician in detecting the immediate effects of concussion on mental status, tracking resolution of immediate postconcussive mental status abnormalities, and making more informed decisions on return to play after injury.
...
...