Cumulative advantage/disadvantage and the life course: cross-fertilizing age and social science theory.

@article{Dannefer2003CumulativeAA,
  title={Cumulative advantage/disadvantage and the life course: cross-fertilizing age and social science theory.},
  author={Dale Dannefer},
  journal={The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences},
  year={2003},
  volume={58 6},
  pages={
          S327-37
        }
}
  • D. Dannefer
  • Published 1 November 2003
  • Law
  • The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences
Age and cumulative advantage/disadvantage theory have obvious logical, theoretical, and empirical connections, because both are inherently and irreducibly related to the passage of time. Over the past 15 years, these connections have resulted in the elaboration and application of the cumulative advantage-disadvantage perspective in social gerontology, especially in relation to issues of heterogeneity and inequality. However, its theoretical origins, connections, and implications are not widely… 

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