Cultured Monkeys

@article{Huffman2008CulturedM,
  title={Cultured Monkeys},
  author={Michael Alan Huffman and Charmalie A. D. Nahallage and Jean-Baptiste Leca},
  journal={Current Directions in Psychological Science},
  year={2008},
  volume={17},
  pages={410 - 414}
}
Sixty years ago, the notion that animals could have culture was unthinkable to most behavioral scientists. Today, evidence for innovation, transmission, acquisition, long-term maintenance, and intergroup variation of behavior exists throughout the animal kingdom. What can the longitudinal and comparative study of monkeys handling stones tell us about how culture evolved in humans? Now in its 30th year, the systematic study of stone-handling behavior in multiple troops of Japanese macaques has… Expand

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