Culture and procedural justice: The influence of power distance on reactions to voice.

@article{Brockner2001CultureAP,
  title={Culture and procedural justice: The influence of power distance on reactions to voice.},
  author={J. Brockner and G. Ackerman and J. Greenberg and M. Gelfand and A. M. Francesco and Z. Chen and K. Leung and G. Bierbrauer and Carolina G{\'o}mez and Bradley L. Kirkman and D. Shapiro},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Social Psychology},
  year={2001},
  volume={37},
  pages={300-315}
}
Abstract A central premise of the procedural justice literature—based on studies conducted mainly in the United States—is that people react unfavorably when they have little voice in a decision-making process. The studies reported here evaluated whether the magnitude of voice effects varies across cultures. As predicted, Studies 1–3 showed that the tendency for people to respond less favorably (i.e., with lower organizational commitment) to lower levels of voice was greater in low power… Expand
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