Culture and Hallucinations: Overview and Future Directions

@article{Lari2014CultureAH,
  title={Culture and Hallucinations: Overview and Future Directions},
  author={Frank Lar{\o}i and Tanya Marie Luhrmann and Vaughan Bell and William A. Jr. Christian and Smita Neelkanth Deshpande and Charles Fernyhough and Janis H. Jenkins and Angela Woods},
  journal={Schizophrenia Bulletin},
  year={2014},
  volume={40},
  pages={S213 - S220}
}
A number of studies have explored hallucinations as complex experiences involving interactions between psychological, biological, and environmental factors and mechanisms. Nevertheless, relatively little attention has focused on the role of culture in shaping hallucinations. This article reviews the published research, drawing on the expertise of both anthropologists and psychologists. We argue that the extant body of work suggests that culture does indeed have a significant impact on the… 
Hallucinations Beyond Voices: A Conceptual Review of the Phenomenology of Altered Perception in Psychosis
TLDR
It is suggested that future research efforts strive to incorporate a broader range of experiential alterations, potentially expanding on traditional definitions of hallucinations, with a focus on their relevance for hallucinations.
Content Matters, a Qualitative Analysis of Verbal Hallucinations
TLDR
The analysis shows that hallucinations can both be thematically and narratively organized, by making use of a theoretical framework like Lacanian psychoanalysis, and demonstrates that hallucinatory contents are not random but are about existential issues imbedded in a life narrative.
Auditory Verbal Hallucinations in Persons With and Without a Need for Care
TLDR
Research on AVH in nonclinical individuals is reviewed and a cross-disciplinary view of the clinical relevance of these experiences in defining the risk of mental illness and need for care is provided.
Beyond Trauma: A Multiple Pathways Approach to Auditory Hallucinations in Clinical and Nonclinical Populations
TLDR
This article suggests that trauma sometimes plays a major role in hallucinations, sometimes a minor role, and sometimes no role at all, and finds seemingly distinct phenomenological patterns for voice-hearing, which may reflect the different salience of trauma for those who hear voices.
Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Phenomenology of Auditory Verbal Hallucinations
TLDR
It is argued that an interdisciplinary approach to the phenomenology of AVH can nourish the ethical core of scientific enquiry by challenging its interpretive paradigms, and offer voice hearers richer, potentially more empowering ways to make sense of their experiences.
The Phenomenon of “Hearing Voices”: Not Just Psychotic Hallucinations—A Psychological Literature Review and a Reflection on Clinical and Social Health
TLDR
Several concepts that can support doctors, psychiatrists and practitioners in understanding “hearer” patients are highlighted, particularly attention to the context of belonging, attention to language, and the role of the sense-making process.
Hallucinations and Delusions as Low-Quality Attributions: Influencing Factors and Proposal for Their Analysis
TLDR
This study poses a concept integrating the two phenomena as attributions people make about themselves and their settings so that the elements of any attribution can be used as guides for structuring significant literature on both, and reduce analytical ambiguity.
Arts-based methods for hallucination research
TLDR
ABRM may contribute to the development of neurocognitive models of hallucinations by making hallucination experiences more visible, tangible, and accessible.
The socialization of hallucinations: Cultural priors, social interactions, and contextual factors in the use of psychedelics
  • D. Dupuis
  • Psychology
    Transcultural Psychiatry
  • 2021
The effects of so-called “psychedelic” or “hallucinogenic” substances are known for their strong conditionality on context. While the so-called culturalist approach to the study of hallucinations has
Psychosis and Deafness in Forensic Settings: How Are Hallucinations and Delusions Shaped by Experiences of Being Deaf
TLDR
No evidence was found of unique experiences shaping the content and themes of hallucinations; however, participants reported a learning history of associating deafness with being inferior, which later emerged in delusions of grandeur.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 81 REFERENCES
Hallucinations and Sensory Overrides
Hallucinations are a vivid illustration of the way culture affects our most fundamental mental experience and the way that mind is shaped both by cultural invitation and by biological constraint. The
Auditory Verbal Hallucinations in Persons With and Without a Need for Care
TLDR
Research on AVH in nonclinical individuals is reviewed and a cross-disciplinary view of the clinical relevance of these experiences in defining the risk of mental illness and need for care is provided.
Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Phenomenology of Auditory Verbal Hallucinations
TLDR
It is argued that an interdisciplinary approach to the phenomenology of AVH can nourish the ethical core of scientific enquiry by challenging its interpretive paradigms, and offer voice hearers richer, potentially more empowering ways to make sense of their experiences.
The auditory hallucination: a phenomenological survey.
TLDR
A pattern emerged of increasing complexity of the auditory-verbal hallucination over time by a process of accretion, with the addition of more voices and extended dialogues, and more intimacy between subject and voice, which seemed to relate to the lessening of distress and improved coping.
Auditory hallucinations in those populations that do not suffer from schizophrenia
TLDR
The following article discusses the phenomenon of auditory hallucinations in those who do not suffer from schizophrenia, and the mechanisms that underpin pathophysiologic processes in clinical conditions can be elucidated.
Occurrence of hallucinatory experiences in a community sample and ethnic variations
TLDR
The results provide an estimate of the annual prevalence of hallucinations in the general population and the variation across ethnic groups suggests cultural differences in these experiences.
Effect of Culture and Environment on the Phenomenology of Delusions and Hallucinations
TLDR
Comparing the influence of culture and immediate environment on the phenomenology of schizophrenic symptoms by examining the actual content of delusions and hallucinations in three groups of schizophrenia patients suggested greater differences in phenomenology between the Pakistani pair and the British groups.
Culture and the prevalence of hallucinations in schizophrenia.
The Illusion of Reality or the Reality of Illusion
  • I. Al-Issa
  • Psychology, Medicine
    British Journal of Psychiatry
  • 1995
TLDR
Cross-cultural concepts of reality are related to the development and the threshold of hallucinations and it is important that therapists consider the functional significance and meaning of hallucinations as well as the social context and the stimuli associated with them.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...