Culture and Eating Disorders: A Historical and Cross-Cultural Review

@article{Miller2001CultureAE,
  title={Culture and Eating Disorders: A Historical and Cross-Cultural Review},
  author={Merry Noel Miller and Andr{\'e}s J., Pumariega},
  journal={Psychiatry},
  year={2001},
  volume={64},
  pages={110 - 93}
}
Abstract Cultural beliefs and attitudes have been identified as significant contributing factors in the development of eating disorders. Rates of these disorders appear to vary among different racial/ethnic and national groups, and they also change across time as cultures evolve. Eating disorders are, in fact, more prevalent within various cultural groups than previously recognized, both within American ethnic minorities and those in other countries. This review examines evidence for the role… 
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