Culture and Cause : American and Chinese Attributions for Social and Physical Events

@inproceedings{Morris2004CultureAC,
  title={Culture and Cause : American and Chinese Attributions for Social and Physical Events},
  author={Michael W. Morris and Kaiping Peng},
  year={2004}
}
The authors argue that attribution patterns reflect implicit theories acquired from induction and socialization and hence differentially distributed across human cultures. In particular, the authors tested the hypothesis that dispositionalism in attribution for behavior reflects a theory of social behavior more widespread in individualist than collectivist cultures. Study 1 demonstrated that causal perceptions of social events but not physical events differed between American and Chinese… CONTINUE READING
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