Culture, the Media, and Eating Disorders

@article{Becker1996CultureTM,
  title={Culture, the Media, and Eating Disorders},
  author={Anne E. Becker and Paul Hamburg},
  journal={Harvard Review of Psychiatry},
  year={1996},
  volume={4},
  pages={163–167}
}
  • A. Becker, P. Hamburg
  • Published 1 September 1996
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Harvard Review of Psychiatry
The epidemiology of eating disorders, with far greater prevalence in Westernized than developing nations, provides suggestive evidence for their cultural mediation. Although cross-ethnic differences in the phenomenology of anorexia and bulimia nervosa have been invoked as a partial explanation for this, more attention has focused on features of Western societies that could allow disordered eating and the overvaluation of body shape to flourish. In particular, a cultural “pressure to be thin… 
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