Cultural innovation and megafauna interaction in the early settlement of arid Australia

@article{Hamm2016CulturalIA,
  title={Cultural innovation and megafauna interaction in the early settlement of arid Australia},
  author={Giles Hamm and Peter Mitchell and Lee J. Arnold and Gavin J. Prideaux and Dani{\`e}le G. Questiaux and Nigel A. Spooner and Vladimir A. Levchenko and Elizabeth Foley and Trevor H. Worthy and Birgitta Stephenson and Vincent Coulthard and C. Coulthard and Sophia Wilton and Duncan Johnston},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2016},
  volume={539},
  pages={280-283}
}
Elucidating the material culture of early people in arid Australia and the nature of their environmental interactions is essential for understanding the adaptability of populations and the potential causes of megafaunal extinctions 50–40 thousand years ago (ka). Humans colonized the continent by 50 ka, but an apparent lack of cultural innovations compared to people in Europe and Africa has been deemed a barrier to early settlement in the extensive arid zone. Here we present evidence from… 
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