Cultural assemblages show nested structure in humans and chimpanzees but not orangutans

@article{Kamilar2013CulturalAS,
  title={Cultural assemblages show nested structure in humans and chimpanzees but not orangutans},
  author={Jason M. Kamilar and Quentin D. Atkinson},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  year={2013},
  volume={111},
  pages={111 - 115}
}
  • J. Kamilar, Q. Atkinson
  • Published 9 December 2013
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Significance The evolution of culture is well-documented in the human archeological and fossil records, but equivalent data are absent for nonhuman primates. Here, we use modern variation to learn about processes of temporal evolution by measuring nestedness across human and great ape “cultural repertoires.” Cultural assemblages are nested if cultures with a small repertoire of traits tend to comprise a proper subset of traits present in more complex cultures. We find a significant degree of… 
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