Cultural Differences in the Relationship between Intrusions and Trauma Narratives Using the Trauma Film Paradigm

Abstract

Two studies explored the influence of culture on the relationship between British and East Asian adults' autobiographical remembering of trauma film material and associated intrusions. Participants were shown aversive film clips to elicit intrusive images. Then participants provided a post-film narrative of the film content (only Study 1). In both studies, participants reported intrusive images for the film in an intrusion diary during the week after viewing. On returning the diary, participants provided a narrative of the film (delayed). The trauma film narratives were scored for memory-content variables. It was found that for British participants, higher levels of autonomous orientation (i.e. expressions of autonomy and self-determination) and self-focus in the delayed narratives were correlated significantly with fewer intrusions. For the East Asian group, lower levels of autonomous orientation and greater focus on others were correlated significantly with fewer intrusions. Additionally, Study 2 found that by removing the post-film narrative task there was a significant increase in the number of intrusions relative to Study 1, suggesting that the opportunity to develop a narrative resulted in fewer intrusions. These findings suggest that the greater the integration and contextualization of the trauma memory, and the more the trauma memory reflects culturally appropriate remembering, the fewer the intrusions.

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0106759

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Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Jobson2014CulturalDI, title={Cultural Differences in the Relationship between Intrusions and Trauma Narratives Using the Trauma Film Paradigm}, author={Laura Jobson and Tim Dalgleish}, booktitle={PloS one}, year={2014} }