Cultural Constraints on Grammar and Cognition in Pirahã

@article{Everett2005CulturalCO,
  title={Cultural Constraints on Grammar and Cognition in Pirah{\~a}},
  author={D. Everett},
  journal={Current Anthropology},
  year={2005},
  volume={46},
  pages={621 - 646}
}
  • D. Everett
  • Published 2005
  • Sociology
  • Current Anthropology
  • The Pirah language challenges simplistic application of Hocketts nearly universally accepted design features of human language by showing that some of these features (interchangeability, displacement, and productivity) may be culturally constrained. In particular, Pirah culture constrains communication to nonabstract subjects which fall within the immediate experience of interlocutors. This constraint explains a number of very surprising features of Pirah grammar and culture: the absence of… CONTINUE READING
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