Cultivation of a thermophilic ammonia oxidizing archaeon synthesizing crenarchaeol.

@article{delaTorre2008CultivationOA,
  title={Cultivation of a thermophilic ammonia oxidizing archaeon synthesizing crenarchaeol.},
  author={Jose R. de la Torre and Christopher B. Walker and Anitra E. Ingalls and Martin K{\"o}nneke and David A. Stahl},
  journal={Environmental microbiology},
  year={2008},
  volume={10 3},
  pages={
          810-8
        }
}
The widespread occurrence and diversity of ammonia oxidizing Archaea suggests their contribution to the nitrogen cycle is of global significance. Their distribution appeared limited to low- and moderate-temperature environments until the recent finding of a diagnostic membrane lipid, crenarchaeol, in terrestrial hot springs. We report here the cultivation of a thermophilic nitrifier ('Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii'), an autotrophic crenarchaeote growing up to 74 degrees C by aerobic… 
Physiology and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea.
TLDR
Comparative studies provide compelling evidence that the lineage of Archaea with which the AOA affiliate is sufficiently divergent to justify the creation of a novel phylum, the Thaumarchaeota.
Ammonia-oxidizing archaea and their contribution to global nitrogen cycling: a review
Nitrification (oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite) plays a crucial role in the global nitrogen cycling. Along with the discovery of ammonia monooxygenase coding gene (amoA) sequences in
Nitrososphaera viennensis, an ammonia oxidizing archaeon from soil
TLDR
The cultivation and isolation of an AOA from soil is described, showing it grows on ammonia or urea as an energy source and is capable of using higher ammonia concentrations than the marine isolate, Nitrosopumilus maritimus.
Nitrogen metabolism and kinetics of ammonia-oxidizing archaea.
TLDR
The isolation of Nitrosopumilus maritimus strain SCM1 provided the first direct evidence that Group I archaea indeed gain energy from ammonia oxidation and a respirometry setup particularly suited for activity measurements in dilute microbial cultures with extremely low oxygen uptake rates was developed.
Environmental factors shaping the ecological niches of ammonia-oxidizing archaea.
TLDR
It is proposed that the AOA might be important actors within the nitrogen cycle in low-nutrient, low-pH, and sulfide-containing environments and deducted the possible niches of AOA based on pH, sulfide and phosphate levels.
Community structure of ammonia-oxidizing marine archaea differs by depth of collection and temperature of cultivation
TLDR
Analysis of the community structure of marine ammonia-oxidizing archaea by sequencing the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene shows differing temperature adaptations among AOA groups may be related to community structures and depth distributions.
Ammonia oxidation kinetics determine niche separation of nitrifying Archaea and Bacteria
TLDR
Oligotrophic ammonia oxidation kinetics and cellular characteristics of the mesophilic crenarchaeon ‘Candidatus Nitrosopumilus maritimus’ strain SCM1 support the hypothesis that nitrification is more prevalent in the marine nitrogen cycle than accounted for in current biogeochemical models.
Distribution and Activity of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea in Natural Environments
TLDR
The complete genome sequence of C. symbiosum was determined from a metagenomic library providing further insights into the potential physiological properties of uncultured ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), and there is now unambiguous evidence for the occurrence of AOA in environments of elevated temperature.
Nitrification of archaeal ammonia oxidizers in a high- temperature hot spring
TLDR
The results suggest the importance of archaeal rather than bacterial ammonia oxidation in driving the nitrogen cycle in terrestrial geothermal environments.
Candidatus Nitrosopolaris, a genus of putative ammonia-oxidizing archaea with a polar/alpine distribution
TLDR
Four novel metagenome-assembled genomes assigned to the genus “UBA10452” are reported, an uncultured lineage of putative AOA in the family Nitrososphaeraceae, and it is hypothesized that the distribution of Ca.
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