Cultivation in the Dark of the Blue‐green Alga Fremyella diplosiphon. A Photoreversible Effect of Green and Red Light on Growth Rate

@article{Diakoff1975CultivationIT,
  title={Cultivation in the Dark of the Blue‐green Alga Fremyella diplosiphon. A Photoreversible Effect of Green and Red Light on Growth Rate},
  author={Stephen Diakoff and Joseph Scheibe},
  journal={Physiologia Plantarum},
  year={1975},
  volume={34},
  pages={125-128}
}
The blue-green alga Fremyella diplosiphon Drouet can be grown in the dark on a medium consisting of mineral salts, glucose, and casein hydrolysate. A variety of organic substances was tested for effectiveness as a carbon or nitrogen source. The most effective individual compounds were glucose and citrulline, respectively. A daily irradiation of 5 min green light depresses the dark growth rate. The effect of green is reversible by brief irradiation with red light, and multiple photoreversibility… 
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