Cuckoos versus reed warblers: Adaptations and counteradaptations

@article{Davies1988CuckoosVR,
  title={Cuckoos versus reed warblers: Adaptations and counteradaptations},
  author={Nicholas Barry Davies and Michael de L. Brooke},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1988},
  volume={36},
  pages={262-284}
}
Responses of great reed warblers Acrocephalus arundinaceus to experimental brood parasitism: the effects of a cuckoo Cuculus canorus dummy and egg mimicry
TLDR
Great reed warblers in the authors' heavily parasitised population are capable of detecting brood parasitism in their clutch by identifying the parasitic egg, and the efficiency of this identification depends mainly on the mimicry of the foreign egg.
EGG REJECTION IN MARSH WARBLERS (ACROCEPHALUS PALUSTRIS) HEAVILY PARASITIZED BY COMMON CUCKOOS (CUCULUS CANORUS)
TLDR
The Marsh Warbler's highly developed egg-recognition ability and the good mimicry of Common Cuckoo eggs suggests that this poorly known host-parasite arms race has reached an advanced stage.
Reed warblers guard against cuckoos and cuckoldry
TLDR
It is concluded that male reed warblers do increase nest guarding in response to cuckoos, but only after their females have begun egg laying, when there are less likely to be costs in lost paternity.
Behaviour of African turdid hosts towards experimental parasitism with artificial red-chested cuckoo Cuculus solitarius eggs
TLDR
The hypothesis that rejection behaviour in these two thrush species evolved as a defence against interspecific nest parasitism, with thrushes appearing to be ahead in this particular host-parasite arms race is supported.
Common Cuckoo Cuculus canorus and host behaviour at Reed Warbler Acrocephalus scirpaceus nests
TLDR
When partially depredating host clutches, Cuckoos showed the same behavioural pattern at parasitized and unparasitized nests, indicating that the latter may act as a potential reserve for egg-laying.
Responses of Reed Warblers Acrocephalus scirpaceus to Non-Mimetic Eggs of Different Sizes in a Nest Parasitism Experiment
TLDR
Egg size differences apparently affect the mode and speed but not the rate of egg rejection in this host population of Reed Warbler Acrocephalus scirpaceus parasitized by Common Cuckoos Cuculus canorus.
The importance of nest cleaning in egg rejection behaviour of great reed warblers Acrocephalus arundinaceus
TLDR
A hierarchical concept is proposed to understand egg rejection behaviour of the great reed warbler, and it is proposed that hosts reject all non-egg shaped objects as a general cleaning mechanism and adaptations for the hosts’ ability to recognise their own eggs allows them to distinguish these eggs from similar objects and parasitic eggs.
Conflict between egg recognition and egg rejection decisions in common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) hosts
Common cuckoos (Cuculus canorus) are obligate brood parasites, laying eggs into nests of small songbirds. The cuckoo hatchling evicts all eggs and young from a nest, eliminating hosts’ breeding
Egg rejection behavior in a population exposed to parasitism: Village Weavers on Hispaniola
TLDR
E egg rejection has not necessarily decreased in Hispaniolan weavers, but it may act in a plastic manner, increasing where cowbirds are present, and the differences could be due to phenotypic plasticity.
Egg rejection behaviour in the great reed warbler (Acrocephalus arundinaceus): the effect of egg type
TLDR
The observations suggest the lack of plasticity in the mode and timing of ejection behaviour towards experimental cuckoo eggs of different types in great reed warblers.
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References

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TLDR
Counterparts of the cuckoos are known among insects, of which several groups are specialized for interactions with social insects, ranging from facultative commensalism to an inquilinism close to the cucksoo nexus.
Life Style of Coccyzus Pumilus, A Tropical Cuckoo
TLDR
A life history of the Dwarf Cuckoo (Coccyzus pumilus) is potentially more than a simple addition to the authors' knowledge of the rich, but still relatively undocumented, avifauna of the American tropics.
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TLDR
Comparing the ecology of different populations of a single species to determine the selective history of reproductive rates, especially of clutch size, may help to understand the evolution of reproductive biology.
An Experimental and Teleonomic Investigation of Avian Brood Parasitism
TLDR
Avian brood parasitism, the phenomenon in which certain birds, the parasites, deposit their eggs in the nests of other birds, their hosts, is especially well suited to teleonomic studies since it provides a system in which the presence or absence of relatively obvious adaptations can be examined in two interacting genetic lineages.
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TLDR
Three new experiments reported here were done on naturally breeding Gray Catbirds (Dumetella carolinensis) and showed that catbirds are extremely intolerant of foreign eggs placed in their nests.
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TLDR
Other correlates of egg size such as the gas conductance of the egg shell and particularly the water loss properties of eggs, problems which Heinroth had already mentioned some 50 years ago in his classical treatise on incubation time are analyzed.
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