Cuckoos and their fosterers: uncovering details of Edward Blyth's field experiments

@article{Sealy2009CuckoosAT,
  title={Cuckoos and their fosterers: uncovering details of Edward Blyth's field experiments},
  author={Spencer George Sealy},
  journal={Archives of Natural History},
  year={2009},
  volume={36},
  pages={129-135}
}
  • S. Sealy
  • Published 1 April 2009
  • Biology
  • Archives of Natural History
In a paper published in the Magazine of natural history in 1835, Edward Blyth (1810–1873) summarized information pertinent to the life history of the brood-parasitic common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) in England, and its interactions with some of its foster species. He highlighted findings and ideas of other individuals and injected some of his own anecdotal observations into this account. Most interestingly, he alluded to experiments he had conducted or intended to conduct to elucidate the… Expand
Antoine Joseph Lottinger's first book on the common cuckoo and its fosterers: a rare book with three different title-pages
Responses of fosterers to parasitism by the common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus), recorded experimentally by Antoine Joseph Lottinger in eastern France between 1772 and 1775, were published in a book inExpand
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The authors' knowledge of cuckoo biology is far from complete, however, and it is predicted that continuing research often incorporating new technologies will refine and extend the understanding of the cuckoos’s extraordinary biology. Expand

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The authors' knowledge of cuckoo biology is far from complete, however, and it is predicted that continuing research often incorporating new technologies will refine and extend the understanding of the cuckoos’s extraordinary biology. Expand
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