Cuckoos Combat Socially Transmitted Defenses of Reed Warbler Hosts with a Plumage Polymorphism

@article{Thorogood2012CuckoosCS,
  title={Cuckoos Combat Socially Transmitted Defenses of Reed Warbler Hosts with a Plumage Polymorphism},
  author={Rose Thorogood and Nicholas Barry Davies},
  journal={Science},
  year={2012},
  volume={337},
  pages={578 - 580}
}
Learning to Recognize a Cuckoo Species that are parasitized by cuckoos have evolved several strategies for trying to avoid having their nests hijacked—one of the most obvious being outright attacking, or mobbing, of cuckoos that enter the area. However, cuckoos are not without evolved defenses—most common cuckoo females look remarkably similar to a small hawk, and this mimicry deters mobbing. Thorogood and Davies (p. 578; see the Perspective by Mappes and Lindström) show that social learning in… 
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Female cuckoo calls elicit anti-predatory behavior in birds
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Although female common cuckoos mimic the call of sparrowhawks imperfectly, they can mislead birds into displaying anti-predatory behavior, providing further evidence to support the recently proposed hypothesis that hawk mimicry in female cuckoo calls can not only fool their hosts, but also the non-host species.
Hawk mimicry and the evolution of polymorphic cuckoos
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Comparative analyses show that parasitic cuckoos with hawk-like features are more likely to be polymorphic than those without, and suggest that mim- icry dynamics are particularly likely to promote the evolution of various guises in parasiticcuckoos to beat host defences.
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TLDR
The results indicate that social learning provides a mechanism by which hosts rapidly increase their nest defense against brood parasites, and enables hosts to track fine-scale spatiotemporal variation in parasitism and may influence the coevolutionary trajectories and population dynamics of brood parasites and hosts.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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