Crystallin genes: specialization by changes in gene regulation may precede gene duplication

@article{Piatigorsky2004CrystallinGS,
  title={Crystallin genes: specialization by changes in gene regulation may precede gene duplication},
  author={J. Piatigorsky},
  journal={Journal of Structural and Functional Genomics},
  year={2004},
  volume={3},
  pages={131-137}
}
  • J. Piatigorsky
  • Published 2004
  • Medicine
  • Journal of Structural and Functional Genomics
The crystallins account for 80−90% of the water-soluble proteins of the transparent lens. These diverse proteins are responsible for the optical properties of the lens and have been recruited from metabolic enzymes and stress proteins. They often differ among species (i.e. are taxon-specific) and may be expressed outside of the lens where they have non-refractive roles (a situation we call gene sharing). Crystallin recruitment has occurred by changes in gene regulation resulting in high lens… Expand
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