Cryptographic Reverse Firewalls

Abstract

Recent revelations by Edward Snowden [PLS13,BBG13,Gre14] show that a user’s own hardware and software can be used against her in various ways (e.g., to leak her private information). And, a series of recent announcements has shown that widespread implementations of cryptographic software often contain serious bugs that cripple security (e.g., [LHA12,CVE14b,CVE14a,CVE14c]). This motivates us to consider the following (seemingly absurd) question: How can we guarantee a user’s security when she may be using a malfunctioning or arbitrarily compromised machine? To that end, we introduce the notion of a cryptographic reverse firewall (RF). Such a machine sits between the user’s computer and the outside world, potentially modifying the messages that she sends and receives as she engages in a cryptographic protocol. A good reverse firewall accomplishes three things: (1) itmaintains functionality, so that if the user’s computer is working correctly, the RF will not break the functionality of the underlying protocol; (2) it preserves security, so that regardless of how the user’s machine behaves, the presence of the RF will provide the same security guarantees as the properly implemented protocol; and (3) it resists exfiltration, so that regardless of how the user’s machine behaves, the presence of the RF will prevent the machine from leaking any information to the outside world. Importantly, we do not model the firewall as a trusted party. It does not share any secrets with the user, and the protocol should be both secure and functional without the firewall (when it is implemented correctly). Our security definition for reverse firewalls depends on the security notion(s) of the underlying protocol. As such, our model generalizes much prior work (e.g., [OO90,YY96,BBS98,BPR14a]) and provides a general framework for building cryptographic schemes that remain secure when run on compromised machine. It is also a modern take on a line of work that received considerable attention in the 80s and 90s (e.g., [Sim84, Sim85, BD91,Des90,Des94,BDI96,BBS98]). We show that our definition is achievable by constructing a private function evaluation protocol with a secure reverse firewall for each party. Along the way, we design an oblivious transfer protocol that also has a secure RF for each party, and a rerandomizable garbled circuit that is both more efficient and more secure than previous constructions. Finally, we show how to convert any protocol into a protocol with an exfiltrationresistant reverse firewall for all parties. (In other words, we provide a generic way to prevent a tampered machine from leaking information to an eavesdropper via any protocol.)

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-662-46803-6_22

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Cite this paper

@article{Mironov2014CryptographicRF, title={Cryptographic Reverse Firewalls}, author={Ilya Mironov and Noah Stephens-Davidowitz}, journal={IACR Cryptology ePrint Archive}, year={2014}, volume={2014}, pages={758} }