Cryptogenic stroke: time to determine aetiology

@article{Guercini2008CryptogenicST,
  title={Cryptogenic stroke: time to determine aetiology},
  author={Francesco Guercini and M Acciarresi and Giancarlo Agnelli and Maurizio Paciaroni},
  journal={Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis},
  year={2008},
  volume={6}
}
Summary.  Strokes that remain without a definite cause even after extensive work‐up are classified as cryptogenic. These constitute about 30–40% of all strokes. Stroke aetiology may remain undetermined for the following reasons: (i) the cause of stroke is transitory or reversible and the diagnostic work‐out is not therefore performed at the appropriate time; (ii) all known causes of stroke are not fully investigated; (iii) some causes of stroke remain unknown. Recent studies have challenged the… 
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