Cryptic introductions and geographical patterns in bird color: Implications for the study of evolutionary divergence

@inproceedings{Avery2013CrypticIA,
  title={Cryptic introductions and geographical patterns in bird color: Implications for the study of evolutionary divergence},
  author={Julian D. Avery},
  year={2013}
}
Species with cryptic origins (i.e. those that cannot be reliably classed as native or non-native) present a particular challenge to our understanding of the generation and maintenance of biodiversity. Such species may be especially common on islands given that some islands have had a relatively recent history of human colonization. It is likely that select island species considered native may have achieved their current distributions via direct or indirect human actions. As an example, we… CONTINUE READING

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