Cryptic differences in dispersal lead to differential sensitivity to habitat fragmentation in two bumblebee species.

@article{Darvill2010CrypticDI,
  title={Cryptic differences in dispersal lead to differential sensitivity to habitat fragmentation in two bumblebee species.},
  author={Ben Darvill and Siobh{\'a}n O'Connor and Gillian C. Lye and Jon M. Waters and Olivier Lepais and Dave Goulson},
  journal={Molecular ecology},
  year={2010},
  volume={19 1},
  pages={
          53-63
        }
}
Habitat loss has led to fragmentation of populations of many invertebrates, but social hymenopterans may be particularly sensitive to habitat fragmentation due to their low effective population sizes. The impacts of fragmentation depend strongly on dispersal abilities, but these are difficult to quantify. Here, we quantify and compare dispersal abilities of two bumblebee species, Bombus muscorum and Bombus jonellus, in a model island system. We use microsatellites to investigate population… CONTINUE READING

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