Cryopreservation of primary human monocytes does not negatively affect their functionality or their ability to be labelled with radionuclides: basis for molecular imaging and cell therapy

@inproceedings{Pardali2016CryopreservationOP,
  title={Cryopreservation of primary human monocytes does not negatively affect their functionality or their ability to be labelled with radionuclides: basis for molecular imaging and cell therapy},
  author={Evangelia Pardali and Timo Schmitz and Andreas Borgscheiper and Janette Iking and Lars Stegger and Johannes Waltenberger},
  booktitle={EJNMMI research},
  year={2016}
}
BackgroundCirculating white blood cells crucially contribute to maintenance and repair of solid organs. Therefore, certain cell populations such as monocytes are attractive targets for use in molecular imaging and cell imaging, e.g. after labelling with radionuclides, as well as for cell therapies. However, the preparation of monocytes may require freezing and thawing to preserve cells for timely and standardised applications. Additional modifications of these cells such as radioisotope… CONTINUE READING
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