Crossover Fatigue: The Persistence of Gender at Motown Records

@article{Laurie2014CrossoverFT,
  title={Crossover Fatigue: The Persistence of Gender at Motown Records},
  author={T. Laurie},
  journal={Feminist Media Studies},
  year={2014},
  volume={14},
  pages={105 - 90}
}
  • T. Laurie
  • Published 2014
  • Sociology
  • Feminist Media Studies
This article examines the cultural politics of “crossover” at Motown Records, focussing on the relationship between genre, gender, and career longevity. Beginning with the Supremes' covers albums in the mid-1960s, the article links notions of musical originality to commercial logics of publishing, gendered divisions of labour, and racialised channels of record distribution. It also traces the rise of the celebrity songwriter-producer in soul, including artists like Isaac Hayes, Norman Whitfield… Expand
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