Crossing the arms confuses the clocks: Sensory feedback and the bimanual advantage

@article{Studenka2014CrossingTA,
  title={Crossing the arms confuses the clocks: Sensory feedback and the bimanual advantage},
  author={Breanna E. Studenka and Kinga L. Eliasz and David I. Shore and Ramesh Balasubramaniam},
  journal={Psychonomic Bulletin & Review},
  year={2014},
  volume={21},
  pages={390-397}
}
The bimanual advantage refers to the finding that tapping with two fingers on opposite hands exhibits reduced timing variability, as compared with tapping with only one finger. Two leading theories propose that the bimanual advantage results from the addition of either sensory (i.e., enhanced feedback) or cognitive (i.e., multiple timekeeper) processes involved in timing. Given that crossing the arms impairs perception of tactile stimuli and modulates cortical activation following tactile… CONTINUE READING
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