Crossed aphasia: An analysis of the symptoms, their frequency, and a comparison with left-hemisphere aphasia symptomatology

@article{Coppens2002CrossedAA,
  title={Crossed aphasia: An analysis of the symptoms, their frequency, and a comparison with left-hemisphere aphasia symptomatology},
  author={Patrick Coppens and Suzanne Hungerford and S Yamaguchi and Atsushi Yamadori},
  journal={Brain and Language},
  year={2002},
  volume={83},
  pages={425-463}
}
This study presents a thorough analysis of published crossed aphasia (CA) cases, including for the first time the cases published in Japanese. The frequency of specific symptoms was determined, and symptomatology differences based on gender, familial sinistrality, and CA subtype were investigated. Results suggested that the CA population is comparable to the left-hemisphere patient population. However, male were significantly more likely than female CA subjects to show a positive history of… Expand
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