Cross-species comparison of anticipatory and stimulus-driven neck muscle activity well before saccadic gaze shifts in humans and nonhuman primates.

@article{Goonetilleke2015CrossspeciesCO,
  title={Cross-species comparison of anticipatory and stimulus-driven neck muscle activity well before saccadic gaze shifts in humans and nonhuman primates.},
  author={Samanthi C. Goonetilleke and Leor N. Katz and Daniel K Wood and Chao Gu and A. Huk and B. Corneil},
  journal={Journal of neurophysiology},
  year={2015},
  volume={114 2},
  pages={
          902-13
        }
}
Recent studies have described a phenomenon wherein the onset of a peripheral visual stimulus elicits short-latency (<100 ms) stimulus-locked recruitment (SLR) of neck muscles in nonhuman primates (NHPs), well before any saccadic gaze shift. The SLR is thought to arise from visual responses within the intermediate layers of the superior colliculus (SCi), hence neck muscle recordings may reflect presaccadic activity within the SCi, even in humans. We obtained bilateral intramuscular recordings… Expand
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