Cross-sectional and prospective relationships of passive and mentally active sedentary behaviours and physical activity with depression

@article{Hallgren2020CrosssectionalAP,
  title={Cross-sectional and prospective relationships of passive and mentally active sedentary behaviours and physical activity with depression},
  author={M. Hallgren and Thi-Thuy-Dung Nguyen and N. Owen and B. Stubbs and D. Vancampfort and A. Lundin and D. Dunstan and R. Bellocco and Y. Lagerros},
  journal={The British Journal of Psychiatry},
  year={2020},
  volume={217},
  pages={413 - 419}
}
Background Sedentary behaviour can be associated with poor mental health, but it remains unclear whether all types of sedentary behaviour have equivalent detrimental effects. Aims To model the potential impact on depression of replacing passive with mentally active sedentary behaviours and with light and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. An additional aim was to explore these relationships by self-report data and clinician diagnoses of depression. Method In 1997, 43 863 Swedish adults… Expand
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