Cross-Device Search

@article{Montaez2014CrossDeviceS,
  title={Cross-Device Search},
  author={George D. Monta{\~n}ez and Ryen W. White and Xiao Huang},
  journal={Proceedings of the 23rd ACM International Conference on Conference on Information and Knowledge Management},
  year={2014}
}
Ownership and use of multiple devices such as desktop computers, smartphones, and tablets is increasing rapidly. Search is popular and people often perform search tasks that span device boundaries. Understanding how these devices are used and how people transition between them during information seeking is essential in developing search support for a multi-device world. In this paper, we study search across devices and propose models to predict aspects of cross-device search transitions. We… 
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