Cross‐Linking of the Extracellular Matrix by the Maillard Reaction in Aging and Diabetes: An Update on “a Puzzle Nearing Resolution”

@article{Monnier2005CrossLinkingOT,
  title={Cross‐Linking of the Extracellular Matrix by the Maillard Reaction in Aging and Diabetes: An Update on “a Puzzle Nearing Resolution”},
  author={V. Monnier and Georgian T. Mustata and KLAUS L. Biemel and O. Reihl and MARCUS O. Lederer and Dai Zhenyu and D. Sell},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={2005},
  volume={1043}
}
Abstract: The aging extracellular matrix is characterized by an age‐related increase in insolubilization, yellowing, and stiffening, all of which can be mimicked by the Maillard reaction in vitro. These phenomena are accelerated in metabolic diseases such as diabetes and end‐stage renal disease, which have in common with physiological aging the accumulation of various glycation products and cross‐links. Eight years ago we concluded that the evidence favored oxidative cross‐linking in… Expand
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