Crocus sativus and its allies (Iridaceae)

@article{Mathew2004CrocusSA,
  title={Crocus sativus and its allies (Iridaceae)},
  author={Brian Mathew},
  journal={Plant Systematics and Evolution},
  year={2004},
  volume={128},
  pages={89-103}
}
  • B. Mathew
  • Published 1 March 1977
  • Biology
  • Plant Systematics and Evolution
Crocus sativus is an autumn-flowering species, unknown as a wild plant but long-cultivated for its scarlet style branches which yield Saffron, the dye and flavouring agent. There are several naturally-occurring related species from southern Europe and south western Asia which form a natural group within the genus.C. niveus from Greece is similar to these morphologically and is included here but is less closely related. The characters of the group are defined, a key to the taxa is provided and… Expand
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In this chapter, the production of saffron corms via somatic embryogenesis is described and can be regarded as a strategic tool for the multiplication of saaffron plants. Expand
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There is a need to use highly sensitive techniques to uncover and extract more practical information about intergenotypic and intragenotypic phylogenetic relationship of C. sativus and related species in genus Crocus for their better utilization in saffron-breeding programs. Expand
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Cytology ofCrocus sativus and its allies (Iridaceae)
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Karyotype variation was found between populations of C. pallasii subsp.pallasii in Central Turkey and also inC.turcicus. Expand
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The analyses made an autotriploid origin of C. sativus from C. cartwrightianus very likely and resolved the relationships among all taxa of the series Crocus. Expand
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Saffron epitomises a crop being produced sustainably in ways that respect habitats and biodiversity. Expand
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This review focuses on botany, propagation, uses and production of saffron, a perennial spice species that is highly priced due to high demand and low supply. Expand
In vitro development of parthenocarpic fruits of Crocus sativus L.
In vitro development of parthenocarpic fruits of Crocus sativus L. was induced by culturing ovaries on MS agar medium supplemented with growth-regulators (2,4-D, GA3 and BAP). Amongh these, 2,4-D wasExpand
STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION OF THE PISTIL IN SAFFRON (CROCUS SATIVUS L.)
The structural organization of the stigma-ovary tract, of the ovule, and of the embryo sac was studied by optical and electron microscopy in buds and flowers of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) atExpand
Latent virus infections in Crocus sativus and Crocus cartwrightianus.
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The genetic origin of C. sativus is yet to be ascertained: it may have occurred by autotriploidy from a wild Crocus, probably by fertilisation of diploid unreduced egg cells by haploid sperm cells or from haploid egg cells, each fertilised by two haploid eggs. Expand
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References

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Cytology ofCrocus sativus and its allies (Iridaceae)
TLDR
Karyotype variation was found between populations of C. pallasii subsp.pallasii in Central Turkey and also inC.turcicus. Expand