Crime and the Bell Curve: Lessons from Intelligent Criminology

@article{Cullen1997CrimeAT,
  title={Crime and the Bell Curve: Lessons from Intelligent Criminology},
  author={Francis T. Cullen and Paul Gendreau and G. Roger Jarjoura and John Paul Wright},
  journal={Crime \& Delinquency},
  year={1997},
  volume={43},
  pages={387 - 411}
}
In their best-selling book, The Bell Curve, Herrnstein and Murray argue that IQ is a powerful predictor of a range of social ills including crime. They use this “scientific reality” to oppose social welfare policies and, in particular, to justify the punishment of offenders. By reanalyzing the data used in The Bell Curve and by reviewing existing meta-analyses assessing the relative importance of criminogenic risk factors, the present authors show empirically that Herrnstein and Murray's claims… Expand
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