Cretaceous origin and repeated tertiary diversification of the redefined butterflies

@article{Heikkil2011CretaceousOA,
  title={Cretaceous origin and repeated tertiary diversification of the redefined butterflies},
  author={Maria Heikkil{\"a} and Lauri Kaila and Marko Mutanen and Carlos Almeida Pe{\~n}a and Niklas Wahlberg},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2011},
  volume={279},
  pages={1093 - 1099}
}
Although the taxonomy of the ca 18 000 species of butterflies and skippers is well known, the family-level relationships are still debated. Here, we present, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the superfamilies Papilionoidea, Hesperioidea and Hedyloidea to date based on morphological and molecular data. We reconstructed their phylogenetic relationships using parsimony and Bayesian approaches. We estimated times and rates of diversification along lineages in order… 

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