Credit, Copyright, and the Circulation of Scientific Knowledge: The Royal Society in the Long Nineteenth Century

@article{Fyfe2018CreditCA,
  title={Credit, Copyright, and the Circulation of Scientific Knowledge: The Royal Society in the Long Nineteenth Century},
  author={Aileen Fyfe and Julie McDougall-Waters and Noah Moxham},
  journal={Victorian Periodicals Review},
  year={2018},
  volume={51},
  pages={597 - 615}
}
Abstract:In this paper, we consider the Royal Society's attitudes towards the copying, reprinting, and reuse of material from its Philosophical Transactions during the long nineteenth century. The contents of the Transactions circulated in print in a variety of ways beyond its traditional biannual parts and bound annual volumes. This included the private circulation of authors' separate copies of papers; the reissuing of papers in authors' collected works; the incorporation of material into… 
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