Credentialing Complementary and Alternative Medical Providers

@article{Eisenberg2002CredentialingCA,
  title={Credentialing Complementary and Alternative Medical Providers},
  author={David M Eisenberg and Michael H. Cohen and Andrea L Hrbek and Jonathan Grayzel and Maria I. Van Rompay and Richard Cooper},
  journal={Annals of Internal Medicine},
  year={2002},
  volume={137},
  pages={965-973}
}
Since the late 19th century, state legislatures and professional medical organizations have developed mechanisms to license physicians and other conventional nonphysician providers, establish standards of practice, and protect health care consumers by establishing standardized credentials as markers of competence. The recent explosion in the popularity of complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies (for example, chiropractic, acupuncture, naturopathy, massage therapy, homeopathy, and… 
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