Creation of training aids for human remains detection canines utilizing a non-contact, dynamic airflow volatile concentration technique.

@article{DeGreeff2012CreationOT,
  title={Creation of training aids for human remains detection canines utilizing a non-contact, dynamic airflow volatile concentration technique.},
  author={Lauryn E. DeGreeff and Barbara A Weakley-Jones and Kenneth G. Furton},
  journal={Forensic science international},
  year={2012},
  volume={217 1-3},
  pages={32-8}
}
Human remains detection (HRD) canines are trained to locate human remains in a variety of locations and situations which include minimal quantities of remains that may be buried, submerged or extremely old. The aptitude of HRD canines is affected by factors such as training, familiarity with the scent source and environmental conditions. Access to appropriate training aids is a common issue among HRD canine handlers due to overly legal restrictions, difficulty in access and storage, and the… CONTINUE READING
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