Crb apical polarity proteins maintain zebrafish retinal cone mosaics via intercellular binding of their extracellular domains.

@article{Zou2012CrbAP,
  title={Crb apical polarity proteins maintain zebrafish retinal cone mosaics via intercellular binding of their extracellular domains.},
  author={Jian Zou and Xiaolei Wang and Xiangyun Wei},
  journal={Developmental cell},
  year={2012},
  volume={22 6},
  pages={
          1261-74
        }
}
Cone photoreceptors are assembled by unknown mechanisms into geometrically regular mosaics in many vertebrate species. The formation and maintenance of photoreceptor mosaics are speculated to require differential cell-cell adhesion. However, the molecular basis for this theory has yet to be identified. The retina and many other tissues express Crumbs (Crb) polarity proteins. The functions of the extracellular domains of Crb proteins remain to be understood. Here we report cell-type-specific… CONTINUE READING
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