Craniodental Affinities of Southeast Asia's “Negritos” and the Concordance with Their Genetic Affinities

@inproceedings{Bulbeck2013CraniodentalAO,
  title={Craniodental Affinities of Southeast Asia's “Negritos” and the Concordance with Their Genetic Affinities},
  author={David Bulbeck},
  booktitle={Human biology},
  year={2013}
}
  • D. Bulbeck
  • Published in Human biology 4 December 2013
  • Medicine, Geography
Abstract Genetic research into Southeast Asia's “negritos” has revealed their deep-rooted ancestry, with time depth comparable to that of Southwest Pacific populations. This finding is often interpreted as evidence that negritos, in contrast to other Southeast Asians, can trace much of their ancestry directly back to the early dispersal of Homo sapiens in the order of 70 kya from Africa to Pleistocene New Guinea and Australia. One view on negritos is to lump them and Southwest Pacific peoples… 
22 Citations
The Skeletal Phenotype of “Negritos” from the Andaman Islands and Philippines Relative to Global Variation among Hunter-Gatherers
  • J. Stock
  • Biology, Medicine
    Human biology
  • 2013
TLDR
The skeletal phenotype of Andaman Islanders and Aeta foragers from the Philippines is investigated in the context of the phenotypic variation among other hunter-gatherers globally, to test whether they show a common, unique physique apart from small body size.
The Andaman Islanders in a Regional Genetic Context: Reexamining the Evidence for an Early Peopling of the Archipelago from South Asia
TLDR
The genetic evidence from genome-wide autosomal single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data is reviewed for a shared history between the tribes of Little Andaman (Onge) and Great Andaman, and between these two groups and the rest of South and Southeast Asia (both negrito and non-negrito groups).
Ancient Genomics Reveals Four Prehistoric Migration Waves into Southeast Asia
TLDR
It is found that early genomes from Hoabinhian hunter-gatherer contexts in Laos and Malaysia have genetic affinities with the Ongehunter-gatherers from the Andaman Islands, while Southeast Asian Neolithic farmers have a distinct East Asian genomic ancestry related to present-day Austroasiatic-speaking populations.
What's in a Name? “Negritos” in the Context of the Human Prehistory of Southeast Asia
TLDR
The evidence presented in this double issue of Human Biology speaks more against the category of “negrito” than for it, and the articles in this volume reexamine this hypothesis in a range of different ways.
Introduction: Revisiting the “Negrito” Hypothesis: A Transdisciplinary Approach to Human Prehistory in Southeast Asia
TLDR
The consensus reached by the contributors to this special double issue of Human Biology is that there is not yet conclusive evidence either for or against the negrito hypothesis, but the process of revisiting the problem will benefi t the knowledge of the human prehistory of Southeast Asia.
Early Occupation of Southeast Asia: Dental-Skeletal Evidence
The evolution of Homo sapiens and their early human diaspora into Southeast Asia were clearly significant events in human prehistory. This chapter presents a brief review of some of the
Why Have the Peninsular “Negritos” Remained Distinct?
TLDR
A survey of current views on the “negrito” phenotype suggests that the phenotype originated recently and by biologically well-authenticated processes from within the neighboring populations, and that their continued distinctiveness has resulted from a wish to maintain a complementary advantage vis-à-vis other, less specialized populations.
Complete mitochondrial DNA genome variation in Peninsular Malaysia
The peopling of Southeast Asia has been vigorously debated over the past few decades by archaeologists, linguists and anthropologists, as well as evolutionary and population geneticists. Several
Genetic architecture of dusunic, murutic and paitanic ethnic groups of Sabah, Malaysia as revealed by high density genotyping arrays
The native ethnic groups of Sabah are categorized under the 'North Borneo' stock of the Austronesian linguistic family. It is generally believed that the native groups of Northern Borneo are
Mitochondrial DNA Polymorphisms of the Saisiyat Indigenous Group of Taiwan, Search for a Negrito Signature
TLDR
Most likely, the physical characteristics, languages, and the genetic makeup of the Negritos in Taiwan have been diluted as the result of heavy migration from the mainland in the last 400 years.
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