Cranial shape and size variation in human evolution: structural and functional perspectives

@article{Bruner2007CranialSA,
  title={Cranial shape and size variation in human evolution: structural and functional perspectives},
  author={Emiliano Bruner},
  journal={Child's Nervous System},
  year={2007},
  volume={23},
  pages={1357-1365}
}
  • E. Bruner
  • Published 7 August 2007
  • Biology
  • Child's Nervous System
A glimpse into modern paleoanthropologyIn the last decades, paleoanthropology has been deeply modified, changing from a descriptive and historical science to a more quantitative and analytical discipline. The covariation of multiple traits is investigated to study the evolutionary changes of the underlying anatomical models, mostly through the introduction of digital biomedical imaging procedures and of computed geometrical analyses supported by multivariate statistics.Functional craniologyThe… 
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Human midsagittal brain shape variation: patterns, allometry and integration
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The major patterns of correlation between morphological features, the effect of size and sex on general anatomy, and the degree of integration between different cortical and subcortical areas were described and quantified.
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