Cranial anatomy of the extinct amphisbaenian Rhineura hatcherii (Squamata, Amphisbaenia) based on high‐resolution X‐ray computed tomography

@article{Kearney2005CranialAO,
  title={Cranial anatomy of the extinct amphisbaenian Rhineura hatcherii (Squamata, Amphisbaenia) based on high‐resolution X‐ray computed tomography},
  author={M. Kearney and J. Maisano and T. Rowe},
  journal={Journal of Morphology},
  year={2005},
  volume={264}
}
The fossilized skull of a small extinct amphisbaenian referable to Rhineura hatcherii Baur is described from high‐resolution X‐ray computed tomographic (HRXCT) imagery of a well‐preserved mature specimen from the Brule Formation of Badlands National Park, South Dakota. Marked density contrast between bones and surrounding matrix and at bone‐to‐bone sutures enabled the digital disarticulation of individual skull elements. These novel visualizations provide insight into the otherwise inaccessible… Expand
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